Classic Long Life

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Bowellism Loydsbuilding

Lloyds center in London- Bowellism

Products that last should have a style that will be valued in the future. Let’s say at least twenty years in case of the refrigerator. An inspirational example is the Bowellism style, showing the functional elements like pipes on the exterior. The refrigerator could have it’s coils visible on the outside instead of hided at the back, making it easy to clean.

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The refrigerator might become a beautiful furniture peace, one that you might even want to inherit.

6. Refrigerator Design for disassembly and reassembly

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As mentioned in the book, Products that last, this strategy has overlap with the previous three strategies. One extra possibility that this strategy brings is that components of other products assembled to build something different.

6.1 The insulation can be used for decades so the housing with insulation should be easy to separate from the electronics.
6.2 The vacuum pump should be housed and connected in such a way that it can be replaced by a different one. It could be a more efficient one (upgrade) or a pump from a different manufacture because this particular one could be out of stock in the future. (Inverted standardization)

5. Refrigerator Design for upgradability and adaptability

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5.1 It would be great if refrigerators could be upgraded by only changing the door. The body of the refrigerator would only be an insulated cupboard and the cooling system would be housed in the door.

5.2 Adaptability: The refrigerator system can changed depending on your needs.
A modular system that can be extended by adding compartments. Compartment can be switched off so that is just a coolbox without active cooling, or they can be taken to a new location. (Mobile box for a party, sailing, pick nick…)
The system can be upgraded by changing the compartment that houses the cooling system.
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4. Refrigerator Design for ease of maintenance and repair

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4.1 A smart fridge could monitor your energy use and give advice when to maintain the product.

4.2 Monitoring could also be done with an old fashioned fridge thermometer. And by only adding wheels under the refrigerator, maintenance can be made easier. The coils at the back should be cleaned every three months to prevent dust from clogging the system, which can increase energy use op to 30%.

chillerator

 

4.3 Standard Interface of product:
Opening the door and seeing the light on the inside. The color of this light could indicate the temperature. If the door is opened long the color will change towards red.

3. Refrigerator Design for standardization and compatibility

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Circular Design Strategies, Standardization & Compatibility

3.1 Incorporate electronics that can communicate with different devices, Bluetooth, NFC. There are many refrigerator concepts around that predict the use cutting edge technologies. My goal is to design a long lasting product and adding electronics won’t be my first step.

3.2 A modular design can bring a range of benefits. See chapter 5.2
thedesignerpad.com modular sensation

-Improved product component: A new door that saves energy by opening smaller compartments of the refrigerator.

 

3.3 Compatibility on component level
The vacuum pump should be housed and connected in such a way that it can be replaced by a different one. It could be a more efficient one (upgrade) or a pump from a different manufacture because this particular one could be out of stock in the future. (Inverted standardization)